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I can’t think of a time in the last several decades when so many men were hurting and being tested as they are today. The economic meltdown is taking a heavy toll on not only our families and finances but on our hopes and dreams. Anxiety and isolation are widespread. Many men are retreating into isolation, confused and concerned about their identity, legacy and destiny.

In a dramatic scene in the movie Gladiator, Maximus Decimus Meridius and his fellow gladiators stand in the center of the Roman Coliseum before the Emperor and a blood thirsty crowd. This band of brothers face whatever horrors Caesar chooses send against them. Maximus says to his men, “Whatever comes out of these gates, we’ve got a better chance of survival if we work together. If we stay together we survive. Come together. Lock your shields, stay as one! Hold!”.

In John 15;15, Jesus says, “Apart from me you can do nothing.” “Nothing” doesn’t mean a little something! He means none of us can withstand on our own the challenges that come against us every day. We depend on His presence and power to live our lives 24/7. God so often works his sustaining power through our brothers in Christ. He does not intend us to be “Alone Rangers”. The wolf loves the lone sheep. Satan loves “Alone Rangers”. God wants us to have “battle brothers” with whom we can do life together through thick and thin. We need brothers who will watch our back, speak truth into our lives and cheer for us and affirm us in the fiercest storms.

Come join us at NCMM and be equipped and encouraged for whatever battle you’re in or heading into. Bring your “battle buddies” and connect to new brothers as together we experience the special camaraderie we have in Christ Jesus, who is our true identity, legacy and destiny.

© 2011, Dave Brown is a pastor and the director of the Washington Area Coalition of Men’s Ministries (WACMM) and has been the men’s pastor at McLean Bible Church in McLean, Va. He served for 30 years in the federal government’s Senior Executive Service (SES), including eight years as an appointee of President Ronald Reagan. He did his seminary work at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and Reformed Theological Seminary. He’s been a leadership consultant, university administrator and member of the board of directors for the C.S. Lewis Institute.

Last year at this time the media was abuzz with controversy about Focus on the Family’s prolife commercial scheduled to air during the Super Bowl. In the 30-second spot Heisman trophy winning Florida quarterback Tim Tebow appeared with his mother Pam telling the story how she rejected her doctor’s advice to abort Tim because of an illness during her pregnancy. She chose to give birth to her “miracle baby”.

Without having seen the 30-second ad, pro-abortion forces inside and outside the media called for its cancellation because they said it would politicize the single most watched program of the year. Kierra Johnson, executive director of Choice USA, said “This un-American hate doesn’t have a place in this all-American pastime.”

Despite the pressure to cut it, CBS didn’t cave and it was aired. The alleged inflammatory commercial was not what people had been told to expect. There was no overt anti-abortion language or political message, but only the demonstration of a loving and humorous mother-son relationship and a story only God could write.

The critics withdrew into a strange silence and few have told the rest of the story about the continuing impact of Tebow’s Christian witness. As many as 102 million Americans watched last year’s Super Bowl and viewed the Tebow spot during the game. Millions more have watched it online.

Because of all the media hype over the ad Focus on the Family generated more Super Bowl advertising-related, social-media conversations than any other advertiser or brand. Its earned media total of more than $31 million was at least 2 ½ times the earned media total of last year’s most buzzed-about commercial from Doritos.

Surveys revealed that most viewers found it non-threatening and upbeat. 78% said they felt it presented a positive message. 75% claimed that the commercial was appropriate to show during the Super Bowl. Interestingly a May 2009 Gallup poll found that, for the first time since the poll began in 1995, more Americans are anti-abortion than pro-abortion rights and those results continued in the May 2010 survey.

Last Fall Tebow began his rookie year in the NFL. But his Christian witness left a mark on college football to the point that the NCAA banned messages on eye paint. Frequently Tebow wrote bible verses on his eye black. In the 2009 BCS Championship Game, he wore John 3:16 and as a result, 92 million people searched “John 3:16” on Google during or shortly after the game. Similar hits occurred when he wore other verses. A pre-existing has prevented Tebow from continuing the practice in the NFL. Tebow finished his rookie season with the Broncos by starting the last three games and became the first quarterback in NFL history to rush for a touchdown in each of his first three career starts.

Jerry Bridges writes, “What image comes to your mind when you hear the expression “A man’s man”? Is it the picture of an outdoorsman, skilled in hunting and fishing? Might it be the idea of a man capable of building his own house? Is it more along the lines of a tough guy in the mold of John Wayne? There’s certainly nothing wrong with being an outdoorsman, building one’s own house, or even, within bounds, being the solid John Wayne type. But is that all there is to being a man? The truth is that the Bible gives us God’s picture of a real man, and it doesn’t fit any of our stereotypes.”

Tim Tebow hugs his mom in front of 102 million people. He tells the media he’s a virgin and intends to stay that way until marriage. And he’s one of the most physically punishing NFL and intends to remain so until marriage. He’s one of the most physically punishing quarterbacks who loves to run over defenders. Tim Tebow just doesn’t fit the stereotype of the “meek and mild” Christian man. But he is a shining example of “real deal” manhood — a genuine good guy, who boldly proclaims his faith in Christ and practices what he preaches.

© 2011, Dave Brown. Dave Brown is a pastor and the director of the Washington Area Coalition of Men’s Ministries and has been the men’s pastor at McLean Bible Church in McLean, Va. He served for 30 years in the federal government’s Senior Executive Service (SES), including eight years as an appointee of President Ronald Reagan. He did his seminary work at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He’s been a leadership consultant, university administrator and member of the board of directors for the C.S. Lewis Institute.

I can’t think of a time in the last several decades when so many men were hurting and being tested as they are today. The economic meltdown has taken a heavy toll on not only our families and finances but on our hopes and dreams. Anxiety is widespread. Many men are retreating into isolation, confused and concerned about their identity, legacy and destiny.

In the movie Gladiator, Maximus Decimus Meridius and his fellow warriors are in the awesome Roman Coliseum standing before the Emperor and a blood thirsty crowd facing whatever enemies Caesar chooses to hurl against them. Maximus says to his men, “Whatever comes out of these gates, we’ve got a better chance of survival if we work together. If we stay together we survive. Come together. Lock your shields, stay as one! Hold!”.

In John 15;15, Jesus says, “Apart from me you can do nothing.” “Nothing” doesn’t mean a little something! He means none of us can withstand the challenges that come against us on our own. We depend on His presence and power in our lives 24/7. But God also works through the brothers. He does not intend us to be “Alone Rangers”. The wolf loves the lone sheep. Satan loves “Alone Rangers”. God wants us to have “battle buddies” with whom we can do life together no matter what the enemy hurls against. We need brothers who will watch our backside, speak truth into our lives and cheer for us and affirm us in the fiercest storms.

Come join us at NCMM and be equipped and encouraged for whatever battle you’re in or heading into. Bring your “battle buddies” with you or connect to new brothers as together we experience the special camaraderie we have in Christ Jesus, who is our true identity, legacy and destiny.

© 2011, Dave Brown. Dave Brown is a pastor and the director of the Washington Area Coalition of Men’s Ministries and has been the men’s pastor at McLean Bible Church in McLean, Va. He served for 30 years in the federal government’s Senior Executive Service (SES), including eight years as an appointee of President Ronald Reagan. He did his seminary work at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He’s been a leadership consultant, university administrator and member of the board of directors for the C.S. Lewis Institute.

It is commonly observed that when it comes to anything beyond work, weather, or sports, men don’t talk much. Into this vacancy, Wes Yoder has declared war. Bond of Brothers: Connecting with Other Men Beyond Work, Weather, and Sports (Zondervan, 2010) is an unabashed examination of the inner-workings of a man. “The things men don’t talk about are some of the most important things in life,” Yoder writes, and Bond of Brothers is an important salvo on shallow-speak.

The book’s title and subtitle are a bit misleading, however. From it, I expected to read another treatise on the importance of accountability groups to create bonds of male friendship. But my misgivings quickly vanished. Yoder rightly observes that most men’s groups are not even close to being honest; his delineation of why accountability groups are a farce is a refreshing and important perspective. No, this book is less a narrative on how to strengthen bonds between men, and more about the important conversations in which men can and should engage. The bond of brotherhood becomes a natural byproduct of that dialogue.

To that end, Bond of Brothers is a helpful catalyst for meaningful conversation. Yoder ruminates on a variety of topics apparently gleaned from his own bond of brothers dialogue, referred to simply as “Dinner and Conversation.” That they engaged each other’s souls is never in doubt. The longing for a father affirmation; the deceit of sports; conflict in marriage; sorrow; mid-life uncertainty; the irrelevance of church; it’s all there, in unvarnished transparency. Each of these important “conversations” is throughly seasoned with personal story and biblical truth to make it a valuable conversation catalyst for your men’s group.

“No man who reveals only his strength is showing his complete manhood,” Yoder writes. By this measure, Yoder is a man’s man, offering in his book not only wisdom for life but a good dose of his own shortcomings along the way. By the time I had finished this book, I felt that I knew something of the man Wes Yoder. As I set the book down, I found myself longing for another conversation with him.

© 2010, Leary Gates. Leary Gates is the founder and director of BoldPath Life Strategies and a member of the NCMM Board of Directors. This post originally appeared on his personal blog.

In recent years there’s been an extraordinary fascination with angels and an accompanying flood of speculative books (some even demonic) and commercial products, sort of an “angel mania”. The culture, and even many in the church, often sentimentalize and trivialize angels reducing them to amulets, charms and trinkets. Far from the chubby-faced childlike figures often pictured in popular art, Scripture describes angels as fearsome, powerful and even terrifying creatures, nothing like Christmas card material. Fear is often the word used when angels show up. C. S. Lewis once observed, “In Scripture the visitation of an angel is always alarming; it has to begin by saying “Fear not.” The Victorian [modern] angel looks as if it were going to say, “There, there.”
The Bible tells us God created angels as spirit, personal, moral beings who serve as his messengers and executors of his providence in behalf of believers (Heb. 1:14). They occupy the universe and mingle among us. Scripture even says “Some have entertained angels unawares.” (Hebrews 13:2).

Angels are an inextricable part of the New Testament. Jesus referred to them often (e.g., Matt. 18:10; 22:30; 24:31; 26:53). They appeared to the Virgin Mary and then appeared to Joseph instructing him to take Mary as his wife and to name her baby Jesus (Matthew 1:20-21.) They announced the birth of Christ (Luke 2:8-14). They told the shepherds where to find the Christ child (Luke 2:8-12). They came to Jesus at his temptation and ministered to him after He had fasted for forty days (Matt. 4:11). They were at Christ’s tomb where they announced His resurrection (Matt. 28:2-7). They freed Peter and John from jail (Acts 5:19). They gather the elect from the four corners of the world (Matt. 24:31).

Remarkable accounts of these glorious and imposing creatures also occur throughout the Old Testament. In 1 Kings 6:14-17 we read how God sent his angels to protect Elijah and his servant who were under attack by their enemies. “When the servant of the man of God got up and went out early the next morning, an army with horses and chariots had surrounded the city. ‘Oh, my lord, what shall we do?’ the servant asked. ‘Don’t be afraid,’ the prophet answered. ‘Those who are with us are more than those who are with them.’ And Elisha prayed, ‘O LORD, open his eyes so he may see.’ Then the LORD opened the servant’s eyes, and he looked and saw the hills full of horses and chariots of fire all around Elisha.”

Billy Graham in his book on angels tells about a remarkably similar account in more recent times. The Reverend John G. Paton, a missionary in the New Hebrides Islands, recounted a thrilling story involving the protective care of angels. Hostile natives surrounded Paton’s mission headquarters one night, intent on burning the Patons out and killing them. John Paton and his wife prayed all during that terror filled night that God would deliver them. When daylight came they were amazed to see the attackers unaccountably leave. They thanked God for delivering them.

A year later, the chief of the tribe was converted to Jesus Christ, and Mr. Paton, remembering what had happened, asked the chief what had kept him and his men from burning down the house and killing them. The chief replied in surprise, “Who were all those men you had with you there?” The missionary answered, “There were no men there; just my wife and I.” The chief argued that they had seen many men standing guard-hundreds of big men in shining garments with drawn swords in their hands. They seemed to circle the mission station so that the natives were afraid to attack. Only then did Mr. Paton realize that God had sent his angels to protect them. The chief agreed that there was no other explanation than God had sent a legion of angels to protect his servants, whose lives were being endangered.

Joan Anderson in her book Where Angels Walk tells of Susie Ware, the penniless wife of a pastor and evangelist in Switzerland in 1941, who prayed, “God, I need five pounds of potatoes, two pounds of pastry flour, apples, pears, a cauliflower, carrots, veal cutlets for Saturday, and beef for Sunday.” A few hours later, there was a knock at the door, and a young man carrying a basket, said, “Mrs. Ware, I am bringing what you asked for.” It was precisely what she’d prayed for–down to the exact brand of pastry flour she wanted. The young man slipped away, and even though Rev. and Mrs. Ware watched at the window to their building, the man never exited. He just disappeared. Stories like this are told throughout the world; maybe you even have such an encounter experience.

Angels do God’s bidding in ways we don’t fully see or understand. They issue a steady backdrop of praise and worship throughout the entire universe. They are a massive army of warriors who appeared to Ezekiel as great ‘beasts,’ ‘living creatures,’ flying serpents burning with flames, carrying the chariot of God. They laid Isaiah low in the temple and filled the temple with glory. They shut the mouths of the lions when Daniel was thrown into their den. And they surrounded Elijah and John Paton as defenders and protectors of the elect and come as “grim reaper” to destroy the enemies of God.

A Final Thought: Angels never die. They’ve observed us since the Garden of Eden. They’re smarter than humans. Yet 1 Peter 1:12 says the angels always long to understand the incomparable riches of the gospel. They never tire to plumb its depths for the gospel is ever new, never boring. So why do we tire of the Good News or take it for granted? May we be Gospel-shaped men who incarnate the gospel in our thoughts, words, deeds and the motivations of our hearts to the culture and through our ministries.

© 2010, Dave Brown. Dave Brown is a pastor and the director of the Washington Area Coalition of Men’s Ministries and has been the men’s pastor at McLean Bible Church in McLean, Va. He served for 30 years in the federal government’s Senior Executive Service (SES), including eight years as an appointee of President Ronald Reagan. He did his seminary work at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He’s been a leadership consultant, university administrator and member of the board of directors for the C.S. Lewis Institute.

One of the attendees put it this way, “NCMM is back! It’s turned a corner.” Others remarked, “I was recharged” and “NCMM is at the right place at the right time.” These comments sum up the experience of many of us who traveled to San Antonio from across America for NCMM’s Fall Leadership Conference – Reload ‘10. Since its founding in 1996, NCMM has been gathering leaders of the Christian men’s movement to “do together what we cannot do alone”. Fourteen years later we’re opening a whole new chapter in the special ministry God has given us of calling men out and up to the nobler masculinity only found in Jesus Christ

“Reload” delivered both a re-commitment to that calling with an added emphasis on the critical importance of strengthening relational ministry to and among men. This new thrust is captured in renaming NCMM as the National Coalition of Ministries to Men.

One might ask, “Is this name change really just a distinction without a difference?” NCMM Interim President David Delk explained it this way: “Traditionally, ‘men’s ministries’ has connoted a narrow view of activities and programs exclusive to men, whereas ‘ministries to men’ recognizes that many other types of ministries – such as those with couples, families, and youth – are having a tremendous impact in men’s lives.”

He further remarked, “Every ministry which seeks to help men grow as disciples is a ministry to men. Many of our members serve a broader constituency and the new name more accurately reflects the collective mission of our members. We invite like-minded organizations committed to developing biblically-mature men to partner with us.”

David also introduced and welcomed Darrel Billups as NCMM’s new Executive Director, who was brought on board in June after a lengthy nationwide search. While many of us had already visited Darrel by phone and email, after seeing and hearing his passion, enthusiasm and total commitment in San Antonio we knew why he was such an obvious choice to help lead NCMM in this challenging transition. Darrel reaffirmed that NCMM’s customers are its members and its mission is to creatively help them serve their ministries to men.

Some of the week’s highlights included:

Norm Miller, Chairman of Interstate Batteries, shared his powerful testimony about how he came to Christ and his heart to reach men;

Geoff Watkins, Senior Pastor of Powerhouse Ministries, Katy TX, told us “Sermons don’t change men. Truth does!” and “Until you’ve been put under authority you’ll never be put in authority.”;

Robert Emmitt, Senior Pastor of Community Bible Church in San Antonio, reminded us that “It doesn’t matter where you’ve come from, it’s where you’re going that counts.”;

Jon Sheptock, a gifted singer who was also born without arms, shared his riveting story of coming to faith and overcoming challenges every day of his life.

Wes Yoder, author of the new book Bond of Brothers, joined us to discuss the critical importance of men having real conversations with one another. Wes has since appeared on NBC’s Today Show in an interview with Ann Curry.

• At our post-Alamo tour dinner, David Cook told us the remarkable story behind his popular book Golf’s Sacred Journey: Seven Days at the Links of Utopia, which has been made into a movie starring Robert Duvall and is scheduled for a May 2011 release.

David Morrow, author of the bestselling book Why Men Hate Going to Church, joined us to share his provocative new approach to teaching and discipling men.

• We paid tribute to Larry Malone who’s retiring at the end of the year as Men’s Director of the United Methodist Church. Larry’s been a loyal NCMMer and a great ‘out-of-the-box’ thinker. Thanks Larry for your 13 years of faithful service!

Jeff Abramovitz, Director of Partnership Strategy at FamilyLife, shared the brave new world of levering social media to reach and mobilize men. He also gave us an overview of Courageous, a new movie from the creators of Fireproof and scheduled for release September 30, 2011.

• Many regular NCMM conference attendees including denominational leaders stated their intention to do more to recruit more ministries to join NCMM, which was very encouraging;

Heads Up About What’s Coming Down the Pike: NCMM will continue to move the annual conference location around the country but change its timing from November to a mid-summer date. Stay tuned for more details.

A closing word about San Antonio:

For many of us at RELOAD, doing ministry the last few years has been difficult, even harsh. Ministry fruit has appeared to us to be lean and discouragement in abundance. Others of us who are maybe not there know what its like to be in that place. Still others may soon pass through those times. Yet several men in this dry season right now told me something happens to them when they’re around NCMM men that lifts and renews their spirits. Flagging hearts rebound and they’re reminded they’re not alone in the battle for men’s souls. The Lord is with us and for us. And these “RELOAD” brothers were His visible expression of that reality. In the final analysis, relationships are what we’re designed for, what our hearts long for and what count forever. It’s providing those opportunities for leaders to experience the special camaraderie we have together in Christ that NCMM strives to nurture. As one brother aptly shared, “Bring it on NCMM!

© 2010, Dave Brown. Dave Brown is a pastor and the director of the Washington Area Coalition of Men’s Ministries and has been the men’s pastor at McLean Bible Church in McLean, Va. He served for 30 years in the federal government’s Senior Executive Service (SES), including eight years as an appointee of President Ronald Reagan. He did his seminary work at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He’s been a leadership consultant, university administrator and member of the board of directors for the C.S. Lewis Institute.

Registration is now open for the NCMM Reload’10 Conference to be held in San Antonio, TX November 1-3. Click here to register, preview the program schedule, review speaker bios and for frequently asked questions. Speakers for this year’s Leadership Conference include: Norm Miller, Chairman, Interstate Battery; G.F. Watkins, Founder, Powerhouse Ministries; Robert Emmitt, Founder and  Pastor, Community Bible Church;Jon Sheptock, Founder, Jon Sheptock Ministries; and the NCMM members themselves.

As go the men, so go the marriages, families, churches, communities and culture. Today these institutions are in crisis because men are in crisis. Men are largely disengaged, unchallenged, under-led, discouraged, and disconnected. Often there seems little difference between the lives Christian and non-Christian men live. Why do so many men in the church go through the motions of Christianity?

First, many men are nominal, superficial Christians not knowing what they believe and why. This is a consequence of biblical illiteracy. And the second reason flows from the first; very few men have been biblically discipled.

Biblically Illiteracy
Biblical illiteracy is rampant in the culture and in the church. For many men being Christian is less a matter of learning than a matter of cultivating personal experiences and relying on sin management, therapeutic techniques and syncretism, which blindly borrows from non-biblical belief systems.

Superficial Discipleship
Churches today have access to more men’s discipleship materials, programs and courses than ever before. With that kind of arsenal one would expect to see Christian men as a countercultural force and radical non-conformists who make Jesus Christ an unavoidable issue. This is not the case!

Researcher and pollster George Barna notes that most men say their church does little to help them grow as a true disciple. In random, national surveys of Christian men, Barna finds that when asked to name their most important life goal, not a single man said it was to be a committed disciple of Christ, or to make disciples. So what’s going on? Biblical discipleship is absent or superficial because it lacks priority and heart motivation.

Biblical Discipleship
The Greek word for disciple primarily means being, not a follower, but a learner. In biblical times a man would attach himself to a teacher, listen to him, and walk with him. As a result of this personal real-life training, the disciple would take on the characteristics of his teacher. This is exactly what happened to Jesus’ disciples. This is what men growing in Christlikeness look like — reflecting His character, conduct and commitments. Jesus’ disciples did not learn a philosophy, principles, techniques, or methods for better living but a lifestyle of love, truth and abandonment to God.

Men often look for a set of orders for good behavior but Christ doesn’t offer lists of do’s and don’ts but real freedom to be who we already are in Christ. One of a pastor’s primary responsibilities is to disciple men, who in turn disciple their families and other men. But few pastors see men as foundational. Many are MIA because they themselves were never discipled.

The Great Commandment Precedes the Great Commission

In Matthew 28:18-20 Jesus gave his men their Great Commission in life, “…Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you…”

This Great Commission is preceded by the Great Commandment – ‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind…and love your neighbor as yourself” (Matthew 22:36-40). The simple fact is you can’t effectively disciple your family or another man if your own heart is not already being transformed and entranced by God. We pursue the Great Commission not because we have to but because we want to. Whether it’s evangelism, discipleship, prayer or everything else, your heart has to be in it. It’s like the husband who’s asked why he loves his wife so passionately and makes so much of her and he responds “I can’t help myself.” God lovers can’t help but make much of him and in so doing are fruitful doers of the things of God. Get aligned with the Great Commandment and the Great Commission follows.

So What Can You Do?

    The Centrality of the Cross
    Understand how and why God saves sinners. Grasping how bad the bad news is makes one appreciate and savor the Good News. Do an in-depth study of the depth of sin and what Jesus did on the cross. Read John Stott’s book The Cross of Christ.
    Examine Your Heart
    Where is your satisfaction, your treasure, your delight and your confidence? Is it Christ or someone or something else? Contemplate the First Commandment, consider what idols you may be pursuing and embrace the sufficiency of Christ. Read Tim Keller’s book Counterfeit Gods.

    Talk to Your Pastor
    If he’s not leading his men, get a group of like-hearted men who want to be fed and led and meet with your pastor and ask him to invest himself in his men. Read and then give him a copy of Pat Morley’s book Pastoring Men.

    Christian Worldview
    Only 9% of professing Christians has a Christian worldview. Yet the Gospel informs every aspect of life. Know how your faith is to interact with culture and learn how to discern pernicious lies. Do The Truth Project DVD-study by Focus on the Family.

A Discipling Community
There’s no quick easy path or cookie cutter to discipleship. Discipleship can’t be done alone or in a vacuum because it’s about relationships and must be part of a community of intergenerational men. Robert Lewis’ Men’s Fraternity offers a three year journey into biblical manhood which provides the teaching and the masculine context for biblical discipleship.

© 2010, Dave Brown. Dave Brown is a pastor and the director of the Washington Area Coalition of Men’s Ministries and has been the men’s pastor at McLean Bible Church in McLean, Va. He served for 30 years in the federal government’s Senior Executive Service (SES), including eight years as an appointee of President Ronald Reagan. He did his seminary work at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He’s been a leadership consultant, university administrator and member of the board of directors for the C.S. Lewis Institute.

National Coalition of Men’s Ministries changes its name to the National Coalition of Ministries to Men.
New name reflects the broader mission of its members.

Orlando, FL August 9, 2010 — The Board of Directors of the National Coalition of Men’s Ministries (NCMM) voted today to change the name of the organization to the “National Coalition of Ministries to Men.” The new name was chosen to reflect the broader and growing interest in men’s discipleship among members who are not exclusively serving men.
“Many organizations that share our mission to help disciple men wouldn’t think of themselves as ‘men’s ministries,’” explained David Delk, President of NCMM. “Traditionally, ‘Men’s Ministries’ has connoted a narrow view of activities and programs exclusive to men, whereas ‘Ministries to Men’ recognizes that many other types of ministries – such as those with couples, families, and youth – are having a tremendous impact in men’s lives.”

“Every ministry which seeks to help men grow as disciples is a ministry to men,” Delk elaborated. “Many of our members serve a broader constituency and the new name more accurately reflects the collective mission of our members. We invite like-minded organizations committed to developing biblically-mature men to partner with us.”

Darrel Billups, the newly appointment Executive Director of NCMM remarked, “The NCMM is undergoing a lot of exciting changes right now and the board felt that this is best time to introduce a name change. The new name is ideal because it retains the NCMM identity that is widely known while more accurately reflecting our membership.”

Hello,

I’m Darrel Billups, the new Executive Director for the NCMM. I feel so honored to be selected to be with a great group of guys like you. For this privilege, I now have a better understanding of just how much God loves me to bless me in such a way. Thank you for the opportunity.

I am so excited about the expanded role and scope of this new appointment and the direction of NCMM. This direction we appropriately call “RELOAD”. Have you ever had your computer need an upgrade? Did you ever get in your car for an appointment (running late, of course) only to find out the last person that drove the car failed to replace the fuel? Or my favorite is having guests over for a BBQ and the propane tank is empty and it is too late to react in the necessary time.

That is where we are as guys…runnin’ on empty and needin’ to reboot with more power. Well, that is where we are as well with NCMM. We recognize this and we are doing the same. We have new leadership, with the first step of appointing an Executive Director. This is a direct response to our members’ request to head in a new direction. The executive board is listening to the members. I am eager to listen, too.

In the near future, I will be connecting with as many members as soon as I can, but if you would like to talk to me personally, or visit about your ministry please call, text or e-mail me anytime. I hope to meet you personally at our NCMM Annual Conference in San Antonio on November 1-3.

Men chase after men that chase after Christ!

Darrel Billups
916-434-5913-office
805-312-9830-cell
darrelbillups@NCMM.org

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